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International Relations Books Free Download !!BETTER!!



Part One of the text lays out the basic building blocks that one would expect to find in an introductory international relations textbook, and then in Part Two the authors compellingly explore these concepts across a wide range of relevant global...read more




International Relations Books Free Download



Part One of the text lays out the basic building blocks that one would expect to find in an introductory international relations textbook, and then in Part Two the authors compellingly explore these concepts across a wide range of relevant global issues.


The book covers a very wide and comprehensive set of topics in a concise way. There are many topics that I don't typically cover in an Intro to IR course but that I could see being interesting to students (e.g. technology, food) and the short chapters mean the students could quickly gain insights into those topics. However, compared to other introduction to International Relations textbooks, the treatment of conflict and explanations of war is not as comprehensive as I would need for an Introduction to IR course. I think as an overview of the discipline the book would work well, but would likely need supplemental material - especially with respect to interstate war and international political economy - to fully flesh out an Intro to IR course.


I would not classify this as a comprehensive text of introductory international relations. It misses some key components, the most obvious being interstate and intrastate war. My sense is that this omission emerges from its European perspective....read more


I would not classify this as a comprehensive text of introductory international relations. It misses some key components, the most obvious being interstate and intrastate war. My sense is that this omission emerges from its European perspective. In the United States, we still include segments on the causes, conduct, and consequences of both interstate (between states) and intrastate (within state) wars in our introductory IR courses. These text's underlying theme (obvious though never explicitly stated) is that of globalization as a cause of peace.


The book is very comprehensive. It clearly covers all of the major themes, theories, concepts and trends in an extremely dynamic subject matters. It does well in covering traditional, enduring, and emerging issues and problems in international relations. The most recent emergence of the IR world Post Trump is the addressed in this text,especially with respect to the recent threats to NATO.


I think that this book is a good alternative if you're looking to assign a free book. There are definitely better books out there, though. Students learn best when their texts have clear, simple, and accessible organization and prose. This book is, for all intents and purposes, a series of smart introductory lectures. I might not be the smartest guy, but I think that I already deliver smart introductory lectures. So, when I'm looking for a book, I'm looking for a reference guide/companion to my lectures. This book is not that.


This edited volume provides a comprehensive yet not so well integrated coverage of the issues and theories that define the international relations field today. Although the book lacks an index, as the editor noted as being too costly to compile.read more


This edited volume provides a comprehensive yet not so well integrated coverage of the issues and theories that define the international relations field today. Although the book lacks an index, as the editor noted as being too costly to compile.


The book is very Eurocentric and is focused on the diplomatic world through the eyes of Europe and North America. This is an archaic way of teaching and learning about the world. There is one chapter about "culture and religion" (which, first of all, each deserve there own attention) which tells us nothing about how cultural diversity impacts international relations. The "global issues" section is extremely weak. For instance, the chapter on the environment focuses almost exclusively on international agreements, but not on differential expectations for countries, debates around these policies, and the real-life impacts of climate change and environmental policy. This book is not culturally sensitive because there are no people in it. It's as if the authors see IR as outside of the realm of human relevance.


The book at least touches on all of the subjects that I routinely cover in my introductory course on international relations, but the coverage of the subjects vary greatly. I thought the chapters on the environment and food security were...read more


The book at least touches on all of the subjects that I routinely cover in my introductory course on international relations, but the coverage of the subjects vary greatly. I thought the chapters on the environment and food security were particularly well-developed, but other chapters like the one on connectivity, communications, and technology would have been made stronger through more details or applied examples. The historical context given to today's political world is also a bit shaky. Some historical developments are more thoroughly explained than others, and students using this book might find it confusing that some background material is spread across chapters. Also noteworthy, the book contains no finding aids (index, glossary) which would make it cumbersome to students trying to use this in an introductory course.


It was not clear to me whether or how the publishers plan to update this text. This is particularly key for an international relations textbook with such a heavy emphasis on current world affairs. Unfortunately, in spite of the fact that the book is less than a year old, some sections are already debatably in need of updating (particularly Ch. 17, as it relates to U.S. foreign policy). While the basic information conveyed in each chapter will remain relevant, I would want to know the editor's intentions for updating the text before implementing it in a course.


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In a relatively short period of time, the study of China?s international relations has gone from being a topic that interested a fairly small group of scholars and analysts to one that is close to ? if not actually at ? the centre of academic and policy agendas. Moreover, it is not just the importance of these relations that have changed, but also their type and scale. China?s relations with the USA and questions of ?great power? politics may continue to dominate, with relations with the rest of Asia coming a close second; but economic interactions, and their political consequences, with countries in Latin America, the Middle East and Africa are also becoming increasingly important, and have implications far beyond the price and distribution of key commodities.Following an introductory overview of the nature of China?s international relations and diplomacy, this handbook is divided into three main sections:Part I: Ideas and Interests ? changes in theoretical thinking on international relations in China; how ideas are transmitted into the policy-making community; the role of public opinion.Part II: Issues ? major concerns and objectives that shape China?s international relations; historical legacies; sovereignty; energy; human rights; peace-keeping and international responsibility; military modernization.Part III: Relations ? case studies of relations with the USA, Japan, East Asia, Europe, the Shanghai Co-operation Organization, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, South Asia and Australasia.For some, China?s rise suggests an inexorable momentum towards instability and conflict. Conversely, others (including most of the authors in this handbook) point to the steps China has taken to conform to existing norms and expectations of ?great power? responsibility. In spite of these disagreements, there seems to be a growing consensus that how China defines and pursues its national interests will become the key determinant of how the global system evolves in the future.The editor, Shaun Breslin, is Professor of Politics and International Studies at the University of Warwick.He has published books on comparative politics, Mao Zedong, centre-local relations in China and, most recently, China and the global political economy.


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If you are considering this type of career in international relations, diplomacy, or global studies, you may be wondering whether or not you need an international relations degree to advance your career. Read on to learn more about the industry and the five top reasons to study international relations and diplomacy.


Because international relations and diplomacy both address global issues, the two fields are often discussed together (as they are here). It is important to note, though, that while international relations and diplomacy are closely related, the two terms do carry distinct meanings and implications.


International relations refers to a field of study and practice focused on understanding the unique relationships that exist between various nations and cultures. These relationships can impact everything from international politics, law, and economics to security, diplomacy, and governance.


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